Please reload

Recent Posts

I'm busy working on my blog posts. Watch this space!

Please reload

Featured Posts

March Madness Hoops and The SAT/ACT

 

MARCH MADNESS IS THE ULTIMATE TOURNAMENT

As college basketball fans this is a great time of year.  March Madness is the ultimate tournament - filled with excitement, intensity, pressure, anxiety, thrills, tears, joy, tension, drama, great highs, and daunting lows.  Sounds just like taking the SAT or ACT!!!  Having worked with well over 1300 students I can attest to having seen and felt all those emotions.  There are strong similarities between preparing for a big NCAA game and the SAT/ACT.  Even their respective beginnings have a similar feel.

 

WHERE DID THE TERM MARCH MADNESS COME FROM?

The term March Madness traces to the Illinois statewide high school basketball tournament.  In 1939 an official for the Illinois High School Association Henry Porter wrote an article for an in house magazine titled "March Madness".  It stayed in Illinois until 1982 when CBS broadcaster Brent Musberger used the term during the network coverage of the NCAA tournament. Below see 2015 March Madness Tournamant.

THE ORGINS OF THE SAT

The origins of the SAT can be traced to the work of Princeton Professor Carl Brigham.  In 1926 he adapted the first mass administered IQ test called the Army Alpha into the SAT.  In 1933 Harvard President James Conant wanted to develop a tool for selecting public high school students to receive Harvard scholarships.  He connected with Brigham and began using the SAT for that purpose. Initially the test was used for a small select group of potential college students.  By 1957 a half million people had taken the SAT.

 

 

The similarities are quite striking between the two.  Both started out as representing fairly small populations and have grown into cultural terms that nearly all Americans would recognize.  I think it would be difficult to walk into any movie theater, bookstore, restaurant, gas station, etc and find many people who haven't heard of either March Madness or the SAT/ACT.

 

THE GREAT COACH JOHN WOODEN AND A GREAT SAT/ACT COACH CAN MAKE A CHAMPIONSHIP PLAYER/STUDENT.

Both events are usually characterized by certain internal and external capabilities.  I can't think of a championship team that did not have a great coach, was well coached, and played from an excellent playbook.  John Wooden, the Wizard of Westwood, is perhaps the greatest coach in American sports history.  His U.C.L.A. teams won a remarkable 10 NCAA basketball championships.  The coaches in this years final four are incredibly talented.  Between Tom Izzo, Mike Krzyzewshi, John Calipari, and Bo Ryan they have been to 26 final fours and won 7 NCAA championships.  All four teams are loaded with great players but great players need excellent coaching to win.  An excellent SAT coach is critical to the success of a student.  A superior SAT coach knows not only the strategies to success (see my interactive playbooks on ibooks with SAT/ACT plays out of my own achievement test taking formulas found on www.morrillpreponline.com but how to motivate, cajole, and drive his/her student to championship performance.  

 

 

 

 

GREAT COACHES AND SAT/ACT COACHES TEACH THE FUNDAMENTALS

Every great basketball coach teaches the fundamentals to his players.  Every successful SAT coach must do the same- being fundamentally sound in your instruction is vital to a good score.  I always tell my students, especially the athletes and performing artists, that success is based on mastering the fundamentals.  You can always compete , no matter who the competition, if you have basic skills mastered.  For example if an SAT test taker masters the basic skill of process of elimination( found in my critical reading book part 1) he/she is always in the hunt to get the question correct.

 

 

GREAT SPORTS COACHES HAVE A GREAT PLAYBOOK - SO DOES SAT/ACT COACH MORRILL

Great basketball coaches have a great playbook.  The teams run solid offensive and defensive schemes.  The players know their roles and responsibilities.  The playbook is designed to help in the instruction and learning of strategies which lead to wins.  My SAT Playbooks serve the same purpose- to engage, to instruct, and to educate students on how best to attack the SAT.  By using videos, audios, and interactive questions the reader can more readily learn the strategies and skills needed in order to score well on the test. Just like a successful basketball playbook which engages the player on several levels my interactive books reach the reader on several levels.

 

MARCH MADNESS DIFFERENCES VS. THE SAT/ACT TEST

There is one huge difference between the March Madness and SAT tournaments.  In the NCAA you win and go on- lose and you are out.  There are no second chances- keep winning or go home.  For the SAT you can take the test several times.  The majority of students take the test 3 times.  In fact the majority of colleges and universities allow you to superstore your results- meaning you take the best score from any of your tests and use that number in your submission process.  

 

In both tournaments the ability to handle anxiety, pressure, and nerves are key to winning. Wise clock management is a must to win close games and finish sections in a timely fashion on the SAT.  In order to win a championship game a player must be physically, mentally, and emotionally prepared- just as a SAT taker must be in order to score well.  Most of all solid preparation is vital to winning.  A basketball coach must communicate to his players the tendencies of their opponent.  Through my book and personal coaching I communicate the tendencies of your opponent- the SAT.

     

 

WARREN BUFFET AND A PERFECT MARCH MADNESS BRACKET: What is your guess?

 

 

2015 MARCH MADNESS STATS REQUOTED FROM CNN MONEY

  • Coverage of the 2015 NCAA men's college basketball tournament scored the highest viewership in 22 years, averaging 11.3 million total viewers, according to Nielsen.

  • The tournament's final game, the Duke/Wisconsin National Championship, netted the highest rating for a NCAA title game in 18 years. 

  • An average of 28.3 million total viewers tuned in to watch the Duke Blue Devils capture its 5th national championship by defeating the Wisconsin Badgers 68 to 63. 

  • The heavily contested game peaked in its final moments with an average of 33.4 million viewers tuning in to see Duke take the crown. It was an unexpected win -- only 9.3% of the 11.5 millionESPN.com brackets picked Duke to win it all. 

RATINGS AND MARKETING

  • The big ratings are good news for the many companies that bought ad time during the tournament. 

  • For the live game broadcasts, 201 brands including companies like AT&T (T, Tech30), Buick, and Capital One (COF) accounted for $1.07 billion in TV ad revenue during March Madness, according to ispot.tv, a platform that tracks TV ads in real time.

  • Related: Kentucky vs. Wisconsin nets biggest Final Four ratings in 22 years 

  • The tournament -- which started in mid-March -- was broadcast on CBS (CBS), TBS, TNT, and truTV. 

  • Back in 2011, Turner Sports (which is owned by Time Warner (TWX), which also owns this website) and CBS paid billions for the rights to the games through 2024. 

  • March Madness also had a strong showing online. NCAA March Madness Live, the tournament's streaming app, set several records, one of which was generating 80.7 million live video streams during this year's event. 

  • The app also set a record for Monday's National Championship with 3.4 million live video streams. 

  • On social media, March Madness had 350 million impressions across Facebook (FB, Tech30) and Twitter (TWTR, Tech30) -- a 45% increase over 2014. 

  • One of the more memorable moments was Villanova's "Sad Piccolo Player," who became a viral meme.

Congradulations to all the great teams, players and coaches who take part in March Madness year after year.

Please reload

Follow Us

I'm busy working on my blog posts. Watch this space!

Please reload

Search By Tags
Please reload

Archive
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square

© 2017 Morrill Prep Online, LLC 

  • Pinterest Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • Google+ Social Icon
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • Yelp Social Icon